Architecture and Interior Design Writing – Choose A Good Writer For Your Magazine, Website Or Blog

Do you have an architecture and design magazine that requires good writers who can understand your in house style and implement given guidelines for producing timely, informative articles and features to increase your subscriber base?

Whatever your specific needs for a good writer are, this article aims at helping you focus on 5 key requirements of hiring an experienced writer who will deliver value-driven content for enhancing your publication’s presence.

So, take a look below and apply these 5 practical tips for choosing a good writer for your magazine, website or blog pertaining to architecture or interior design.

Tip #1 – Check with the writer for past experience in your niche

While a basic interest in architecture styles, trends, techniques etc. is a positive quality for choosing a writer who can deliver on your long term vision for the magazine, website or blog you own, it is essential you hire a writer with experience in your particular niche.

Writers with mainly health articles, financial articles, SEO articles experience to their credit may not be the perfect fit for your specialty publication, especially if you have a select target market. Face it, the whole point of your publication is to get more readers, win more sales and increase subscriptions, right?

So, why not choose someone who can hit the ground running for your specific content requirements?

Tip #2 – Choose a motivated architecture writer who is clued in on interior design topics as well as SEO

Hiring a motivated article writer who has knowledge and interest in architecture as well as interior design helps you do away with the necessity to constantly spoon feed and prompt the author to create and present informative content.

Such a writer will already possess the skills required to direct pre-qualified traffic to your website or blog with a knowledge of organic SEO when writing on a variety of topics.

This is because even if you are a print magazine, you are sure to also have a blog that will require fresh blog posts on similar topics as presented in the magazine issue and if your chosen writer can switch between both print and web styles easily, you have a good match for two styles of publications in one unique author!

Tip # 3 – Pick a writer who can address customer concerns and connect with your readers

If you have a B2B publication and are looking for a business writer to help get the message across for various products and services offered by advertising clients of your magazine, you need to hire someone with knowledge of market presence of similar products and services if existing, the target audience and possessing a style of writing that grabs attention and gains respect of new customers.

For B2C publishers, hiring a writer with solid knowledge of effective ways of connecting with readers and converting new readers into subscribers is like having an arsenal for assured business success.

Tip #4 – Choose a writer who can provide well researched articles on a variety of topics

Your chosen architecture or interior design writer must not only be able to follow given style guidelines and understand your target readership, but also have the proven ability to conduct adequate research for articles even on new topics, like emerging technology, materials, techniques and global trends.

No valid topic should be considered off-limits and the writer must be willing to explore and delve into various credible sources to write about different facets of the basic information you provide about an assigned topic, making the article valuable to readers!

Tip # 5 – Can your writer work independently to deliver complete articles that are ready to use?

Working with new writers and having to mentor them constantly can be a real pain when it comes to running a design magazine, website or blog, which has so many business aspects to monitor.

Hiring an experienced, knowledgeable and motivated writer can help you concentrate on business promotion, advertising revenue or improving subscription platforms etc. instead of having to oversee the writer’s entire body of writing.

Discover Your Interior Design Style

Before beginning any design project, it is important to discover the interior design aesthetic that works for you. Often, the architecture of your space can help set the tone for the interior; alternately, juxtaposing opposite design elements could be used to express your personal style. With numerous design genres to work within, a general understanding of each can serve as a foundation to begin defining your vision.

The following is a sample of the most widely practiced design genres. There are many more to consider when establishing your personal design style and often, elements of some genres can complement others to create a space that’s uniquely you. There are many examples of architectural and interior design styles to be seen throughout the Seattle area.

Contemporary
Contemporary style is defined by clean lines, sculptural elements and the carefully considered use of color. Furniture pieces are composed of straight lines and are an artful combination of wood, textiles and metals. Whites and neutrals are often accentuated by bold colors. Texture is an important aspect of contemporary design to ensure the space has an inviting aesthetic rather than feeling cold and austere. The focus of contemporary design is function first. Decoration for the sake of filling blank spaces is kept to a minimum; in modern design, accent pieces are strategically incorporated to serve a purpose while also adding visual interest.

Traditional
In contrast with contemporary design, traditional spaces feature furniture and accents that are gracious and ornamental in design. Fabrics for furniture, windows and other parts of the home will reflect elegance through a combination of floral prints, damask patterns and stripes.Wing-backed chairs, claw footed tables, and furniture pieces that hearken back to the 18th and 19th centuries are often used. Highly coordinated spaces are a trademark of traditional design, where textiles are carried throughout, used on upholstered furniture, patterned wallpapers and complementary window dressings.

Classical
Classical design is defined by symmetry, balance and the use of grand focal points. Greek and Roman styling inspire this design genre that is steeped in classic tradition. Inspiration is drawn from historic periods where an emphasis on lavish styling and immaculate balance are key features. Designs are centered on a main focal point such as a grand staircase or ornate fireplace, keeping furnishings in strict order. Upholstery patterns are kept to a minimum, to place emphasis on the architecture and ornate decor.

Country
Country-inspired design can reflect American, French or Swedish country. In all styles, the goal is comfort and honesty in design. Furniture is either handcrafted or made to look that way and presents materials in their more natural, unfinished state. Decoration is often comprised of antique or faux antique pieces that reflect life in the country. Fabric patterns reflect agricultural themes printed on toiles and bleached linens. Colors are generally muted to create a quiet and warm aesthetic.

Once you have your design direction in mind, you can take on your design project on your own or seek professional assistance. The American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) can help you find a reputable designer in your area. If you’re looking for an ASID interior designer in Seattle, NBDesign Group is ready to take on your home or commercial space.

Venetian Architecture and Interior Design

The City of Venice, Italy

Venetian architecture comes from Venice, a city in northeastern Italy which is made up of 118 small islands separated by canals and all linked by a series of bridges. Venice was named for the ancient Veneti people who inhabited this region in the 10th century BC. The city itself was founded between the 5th and 6th century by wealthy inhabitants from the mainland who were fleeing the barbarian invasions.

History of Venetian Design

Venice was the birthplace of unique architectural styles due to the necessity of building homes above the many canals. The buildings were set on closely spaced wooden piles made from the trunks of alder trees. Venetian architecture was influenced by the Gothic style along with Byzantine and Ottoman influences. Some of the more famous Venetian architects were Baldassarre Longhena, who designed many churches in the Baroque style during the 17th century and Carlo Scarpa, a 20th century architect who created many designs of landscapes, gardens and buildings not only in Italy but throughout the world.

Venetian Architecture

Venetian architecture is lighter in structure and more graceful than the heavier buildings in other European cities. Every inch of land was considered valuable so architects never added any more weight or size than was necessary to support the building. The most famous design element of Venetian design is the Gothic lancet arch, where the top of the arch is tall and pointed, like a lance. Another design used in the 14th and 15th centuries is a central hall, called a portego, which is a long passageway usually opened with a loggia with Gothic arches.

Colors That Support the Style

Venetian colors were mostly rich colors like dark reds, muted yellows and bright blues. Many colors were muted in tone and during the Renaissance, they were gradually softened to duplicate natural colors. Of course, you cannot talk about Venetian style without mentioning Venetian plaster. The plaster was mixed with marble dust and applied in thin, multiple layers, then polished to a smooth surface. This gives the illusion of depth and texture. Venetian plaster can also be left unpolished which leaves a matte finish that is rough and stone-like.

Venetian Design Elements

The Venetian style was also used to create beautiful interior designs. In fact, some of the best examples of rich, extravagant Rococo designs were found in Venice. Draperies and curtains were made from materials like damask, velvet and silk. Other elements found in Venetian homes were girandole mirrors, colorful chandeliers using Murano glass and precious stones, polished terrazzo flooring, arches with broken pediments over windows and doorways, porcelain figurines and oriental rugs.

Examples of Venetian Architecture

In order to explore the world of Venetian architecture, we will look at some historical examples.

Doge’s Palace – This structure was originally built in 810 in the Venetian Gothic style, was rebuilt and partially reconstructed a number of times. It is now a museum and is a landmark of Venice.

Ca’ d’Ora (golden house) – Also known as Palazzo Santa Sofia, it got its original name from the gilt and polychrome decorations on the outside walls. The architects were a father and son team – Giovanni and Bartolomeo Bon, who also, by the way, worked on the Doge’s Palace.

From My Heart

My dream is to travel and learn about culture, history and design. I hope some day to visit the romantic city of Venice, Italy; to see the things I write about, experience the culture and the warmth of its people. I would love to travel through the tiny canals in a gondola while viewing its beauty, architecture and arts.

If you would like to learn more and see photos of Venetian architecture and design, please visit my blog.

Copyright 2012 Katy Hahn Designs

This article may be reprinted with the following conditions: Must be reprinted in full with no changes, author information in the article must be included and any embedded links must be active.

Interior Design Books – The Best of The Best

Inspiration comes in many forms. Sometimes, for visionaries like Frank Lloyd Wright, inspiration may come from something as simple as nature itself. For others it might come from years of conditioning and exposure, and the ability to notice a nuance that sparks the imagination. Designers have always seen the world through a different set of eyes and sensibilities. They can take something old and make it new again. They can position an object or color in such a way that not only makes us notice it, but makes us feel it.

During my years in the business, I’ve met a lot of people working in the interior design business at different levels. Some of them are very successful but a better salesperson than a designer. Some have talent off the Richter scale but not a nickel to their name. For some it’s a business but to a special few, it’s a passion. These are the people who inspire me.

Anyone interested in interior design deserves to surround themselves with some inspiration from their peers. We’ve all hit that wall once in a while when we are trying to put together a presentation. Our minds are drawing blanks, the deadline is bearing down on us, and we feel like there isn’t an ounce of creativity left in us. That’s the time to put my pencil down, turn off my brain and relax with a great design book and get lost in another world. Seeing pictures of some of the most beautiful rooms in the world recharges me. It gives me a fresh outlook and I no longer feel trapped by the ideas of my past.

I’ve decided to share some of my favorite books here. I’m not selling them or recommend where you buy them, but these are by far some of the best. If you have any favorites you’d like to share with me, please send me a comment. I’m always in the market for a fresh read. These are not listed in any order of preference…that can only be decided by you.

Architect and interior designer, Jose Solis Betancourt is a regular on the AD 100, Architectural Digest’s list of top designers, sometimes called the Oscars of the design world. “Essential Elegance: The Interiors of Solis Betancourt” covers 14 of his projects. These are rooms where you find refuge and comfort. His use of luxurious fabrics contrasted by his simple arrangement of furnishings and accessories create a subtle and sometimes dramatic effect.

Axel Vervoordt is a Belgium antique dealer who, along with his family, runs an 85 person design firm, a multidisciplinary center of decorative arts and crafts in the Kanaal, a complex of restored nineteenth-century warehouses and silos. His is considered to be a master of color and light. “Timeless Interiors” contains over 20 of his best projects.

Alexa Hampton’s “The Language of Interior Design” demonstrates the exposure and expertise she acquired as the daughter of interior design icon, Mark Hampton. Now regarded as one of the top interior designers of our time, she also licensed product lines from different manufacturers. Her style runs from the classic to the contemporary…each with an astonishing eye for proportion, finish and details.

“Mary McDonald Interiors: The Lure of Style” combines vintage Hollywood glamour with everyday life. She is consistently ranked one of House Beautiful’s Top 100 designers. Her personal style of layering and collections are neatly organized to add intrigue without appearing cluttered. Her combination of styles has been called many things…it needs to be seen to be appreciated.

“Victoria Hagan: Interior Portraits” is the first collection of works for this seasoned designer. First discovered by New York magazine in 1998, Victoria Hagan has become renowned for her” intelligent integration of architecture and interior design.” This is a book about an artist with interior design…relying on what’s not there as much as what you see. Her rooms are magically calm and organized, clean and crisp. This is a book you’ll pick up more than once.

“Vincent Wolf, Lifting the Curtains on Design” is his most recent release from 2010. It provides a glimpse into the mind of designer from concept to completion. His work is clean, sophisticated, and uncluttered. His palettes are weightless and his uncanny sense of using surprisingly affordable objects as focal points is refreshing. Based out of New York, his work spans the globe in both residential and commercial projects.

Also released in 2010 is David Easton’s “Timeless Elegance: The Houses of David Easton”. The book features mostly work that has been unpublished prior to this book and includes blueprints and drawings from the projects to better understand the design decisions that were made. His work is layered, classic even when doing contemporary styling and finished with tons of detail. This is a man who understands art as much as interior design and architecture. Although his clients have great means, the rooms carry an artful refuge and calmness.

Thomas Jayne’s “The Finest Rooms in America” is a collection of 50 interiors spanning the history of the United States. It includes everything from Monticello to New York loft. It’s about the best of the best in both design, periods, furnishings, accessories and fabrics. Jayne himself is an accomplished interior designer but he has chosen not to include any of his own work in this book. This is a book you will reference over and over.

I’m sure all of these books are available through your local bookstore or the like should you care to purchase any of them for yourself or someone who might really enjoy them as a gift. They will provide hours of enjoyment. You’ll probably find that if you leave them lying around on your cocktail table, your friends are likely to pick them up and get immersed in them…and probably ask to borrow them. All of them provide excellent examples of some of the finest interior design work of our time. You’ll find them to be an endless resource of ideas and inspiration. But of course, as with libraries, the collections grow and designers rise to the top. As I discover new books, I’ll be happy to share them with you.

Happy reading.